About the dealer

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About the object

ENGLAND, circa 1810

Provenance: An American private collection.

In ‘Regency Furniture’, Frances Collard observes that Thomas Hope’s ‘Household Furniture’ includes ‘chairs and stools… formed of x-frame supports with some of crossed swords, and couches followed the classical design with one or both ends scrolling, and outwards curving feet.’ Collard remarks that: ‘[t]he influence of his compositions can be seen in the furniture styles fashionable for two decades after the publication of Household Furniture’ (Frances Collard, ‘Regency Furniture’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 2000), p.92).

Whilst discussing George Smith’s ‘A Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, in the most approved and elegant taste’, which was published in 1808, Ralph Edwards states that: ‘[a]n X-pattern was at this time frequently adopted in an attempt to reproduce the forms of classical antiquity.’ Types such as this were ‘said by Smith to be “intended as ornamental and extra seats in elegant Drawing Rooms,” and for saloons and drawing-rooms stools of this kind were sometimes gilt.’ (Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume Three’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983), p.184). George Smith includes designs for ‘Drawing Room X Seats’ in ‘A Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, in the most approved and elegant taste’ (J. Taylor, London, 1808), plate 53.

‘Ackermann’s Regency Furniture & Interiors’ depicts a plate from Rudolph Ackermann’s journal ‘The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufacture, Fashions and Politics’, dated 1828, which shows ‘Drawing-Room Seats’. Seat ‘No. 2’ is: ‘calculated for one person alone. Seats of this kind were formerly more in use than chairs.’ (‘Ackermann’s Regency Furniture & Interiors’, Text by Pauline Agius, Intro by Stephen Jones (The Crowood Press, 1984), p.184, Plate 179).

In The Age of Satinwood’ in A History of English Furniture: The Age of Mahogany and The Age of Satinwood: Volume II’, Percy Macquoid illustrates an ‘X seat’, property of the Earl of Harewood dated c.1805, with gilt carved mounts as on our seat (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p.7, fig.5).

Margaret Jourdain discusses stools which served as ‘ornamental centre seats in elegant rooms’ in ‘Regency Furniture 1795-1830’. She describes the ‘many and various stools of cross-framed design’ as being ‘especially graceful’ (Country Life Limited, 1965, p.60). She illustrates a gilt cross-framed seat, dated circa 1805 in figure 114. She also illustrates a painted cross-framed seat, with gilt enrichments in figure 116, which is based on a design in Thomas Hope’s ‘Household Furniture’, plate XII, No.4.

Bibliography:

Frances Collard, ‘Regency Furniture’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 2000).

Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume Three’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983).

Charles F. Montgomery and Benno M. Forman (eds), ‘George Smith’s Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration’ (Praeger Publishers, 1970).

‘Ackermann’s Regency Furniture & Interiors’, Text by Pauline Agius, Intro. by Stephen Jones (The Crowood Press, 1984).

The Age of Satinwood’ in Percy Macquoid, A History of English Furniture: The Age of Mahogany and The Age of Satinwood: Volume II’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987).

Margaret Jourdain; revised and enlarged by Ralph Fastnedge, ‘Regency Furniture 1795-1830’ (Country Life Limited, 1965)

Thomas Hope, ‘Household Furniture and Interior Decoration: Classic Style Book of the Regency Period’ (Dover Publications, Inc, New York, 1971)

Dimensions

Height: 27.25 inches (69cm); Width: 33.5 inches (84.5cm); Depth: 18.5 inches (47cm)

Stock number

6475