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These two lavishly decorated jewelled bosses originally adorned an Indian dhal ("shield"). The gold bosses are framed by rubies in the style of red petals followed by two bands of bud motifs decorated with rubies and emeralds which surrounds the central band of diamond rosettes to complete the floral motif.  

In addition to adorning the exterior of a shield, bosses had a practical function, for Indian shields were fitted with a pair of handgrips fastened to the interior of the shield by means of rivets; hence the bosses served to conceal the rivets on the front of shields.[1]

References 

[1] Salam Kaoukji. 2017. Precious Indian Weapons and Other Princely Accoutrements. London: Thames & Hudson. p.427.

Price on application



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The BADA Standard

  • Since 1918, BADA has been the leading association for the antiques and fine art trade
  • Members are elected for their knowledge, integrity and quality of stock
  • Our clients are protected by BADA’s code of conduct
  • Our dealers’ membership is reviewed and renewed annually
  • Bada.org is a non-profit site: clients deal directly with members and they pay no hidden fees
Click here for more information on the BADA Standard