About the dealer

Open Monday-Friday 9.30-1, 2-5.30; Please telephone for weekend and evening opening

About the object

ENGLAND, circa 1660

The single panel top with moulded edge. The rails with a central run-moulding, and with pegged mortise and tenon joints. On four slightly splayed turned legs united all round by plain stretchers.

Victor Chinnery discusses joined stools in ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’, commenting that dining stools were ‘made quite high (usually 23-24ins.) to match the height of the table’ (Victor Chinnery, ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1979), p.264). For a stool with similarly turned and shaped legs, see Victor Chinnery, ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’ (Antique Collectors Club Ltd, 1986), p. 265, figure 3:88 (see image below).

6644_17thCenturyOakJointStool-comparator-Chinnery-OakFurniture,p.265,fig.3.88

In ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume Three’, Ralph Edwards comments that joint stools in the early seventeenth century ‘resembled small tables…in design, the columnar legs being generally splayed to ensure greater stability’ and that the ‘carved and fluted legs’ gradually ‘[gave] place to turning’ (Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume Three’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983), p.169).

Bibliography: Victor Chinnery, ‘Oak Furniture: The British Tradition’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1979), pp.264-5.

Tobias Jellinek, ‘Early British Chairs and Seats’ (Antique Collectors’ Club in association with Crab Tree Farm, 2009) – chapter on ‘Joint stools’, pp.213-245.

Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture: Volume Three’ (Antique Collectors’ Club, 1983), pp.168-169.

Dimensions

Width: 17.5 inches (45cm); Height: 22.75 inches (57.5cm); Depth: 11 inches (28cm)

Stock number

6644