Price

£1800.00

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26th King George’s Own Cavalry - Uniform Study, 1910.

Overall: 46cm (18in) x 52cm (20.5in).

Provenance: Tryon Gallery, Bury Street, St James’s.

Watercolour and bodycolour, The progression of uniform of the 26th King George's Own Cavalry. Signed R. Simkin (under mount, lower right. Image: cm (in) x cm (in). Framed and glazed.

The 26th King George's Own Light Cavalry was originally raised as the 5th Regiment Madras Native Cavalry on 23 October 1787 as part of the Madras Presidency Army. In 1788, it was re-designated as the 1st Madras Native Cavalry and in 1816 its name was changed to 1 Madras Light Cavalry. The Regiment was yet again renamed as the 1st Regiment of Madras Lancers in 1886, and was known by that title till the turn of the century, when it was changed to 1st Madras Lancers. In 1903 it was renamed as the 26th Light Cavalry and three years later it became the Prince of Wales Own Light Cavalry and then in 1910, it became the 26th King George’s Own Light Cavalry. During this time it participated in the Third Mysore War, 1789–1792, the Fourth Mysore War, 1793-1798. Campaigns against Dhoondia Wagh and the Polygars, 1799-1830. Campaigns in Afghanistan and Burma, between, 1880-1914. The 26th King George’s Own Light Cavalry served in the South Yemen during World War I as part of the Aden Field Force.

Richard Simkin (1850-1926) was born in Kent, served in the Artists Rifles and attended the Heatherley Art School. He was employed by the War Office designing recruiting posters and providing illustrations for the ‘Army and Navy Gazette’. He married in 1880 and lived for six years at Aldershot before moving to Herne Bay. He illustrated ‘The War in Egypt’ for publisher George Routledge in 1883; and in 1888 produced a volume of illustrated verse under the title ‘Following the Drum - Sketches of Soldier-Life in Peace and War, Past and Present’. Regarded as an authority on British military uniforms, he depicted imperial and colonial troops to create such series as 'Types of the Indian Army' for the ‘Army and Navy Gazette’ in 1901, having gained much first hand information at the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. During his lifetime, he contributed illustrations to numerous publications including ‘The Graphic’ and ‘Boy’s Own Magazine’. His work can be found in many regimental museums.

Price

£1800.00

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The BADA Standard

  • Since 1918, BADA has been the leading association for the antiques and fine art trade
  • Members are elected for their knowledge, integrity and quality of stock
  • Our clients are protected by BADA’s code of conduct
  • Our dealers’ membership is reviewed and renewed annually
  • Bada.org is a non-profit site: clients deal directly with members and they pay no hidden fees
Click here for more information on the BADA Standard